God and Reason… Part 2


Religious symbols from the top nine organised ...

In 2007, the state of Kentucky’s office of Homeland Security officially proclaimed “dependence on Almighty God” as the greatest source of protection of its citizens.

This wording was seen by atheists and non-believers in the Christian God as offensive, leading to the American Atheists, Inc. filing suit in 2008.

In October 2011, the Kentucky Court of Appeals struck down an earlier ruling in favor of American Atheists. Currently, there are plans to appeal.

Why do I choose this as inspiration? It is about simple fairness, the founding principle of America.

I call for reason in addressing social issues, with an underlying respect for every American—regardless of religious affiliation (or lack thereof).

Only with an underlying respect for all citizens—thoughtful reflection as opposed to judgments based on devotion to an unseen entity—there can be a true solution to social problems.

As soon as Americans rely on reasoned judgment to discuss troubles, without fear of repercussion due to differing religious beliefs, it can truly be said humanity is reaching the next phase of its development.

In the shadow of fear of the unknown, we cannot slip into a mode of “dependence” on “Almighty God” for security—as the state of Kentucky did in 2007.

Inflexible dogma of religious thought is antithetical to the stated ideals of American life. Religious belief obscures thorough explanations of the world around us, discounting tangible evidence and lucid thought.

Faith—by definition—instructs followers to take things based on ethereal faith.

In accepting equality, reasoned thought cannot be at the hand of the intangible. Belief in an otherworldly specter is impossible to gain unanimous agreement. For the success of any social policy, there must be terms agreeable to all—and belief in a Christian “God” is not universal.

The devout—of any religious faith—will always disagree on the details. It is why there are so many divergent religions—precisely due to the indefinite nature of faith.

American reliance on faith (especially in regards to public safety) gains no small sense of irony.

A free nation cannot be born in a climate of fear. America must not use terror—in the abstract—in its own battle against religious totalitarianism.

The late Christopher Hitchens summed it up when he paraphrased Socrates in God Is Not Great (2007): “(I) do not know about death and the Gods – but I am as certain as I can be that you do not know, either.”

We must stop this dependence on irrationality—it is the same fear that encourages acts of terrorism throughout the world.

One thought on “God and Reason… Part 2

  1. For 23 years my husband donned the uniform of the United States Air Force. For 23 years, I knew that uniform as a symbol of his oath to give his life as necessary for the ideals of this nation, one of which was the freedom of religion.

    It truly scares and angers me (I am a devout Christian, by the way) that our politicians want to foul the blood of those who have died for this most basic ideal by picking and choosing which religion(s) are protected and which are not.

    Our soldiers fight for the right to worship a blade of grass if you’d like as long as it doesn’t not interfere with my right to worship as I please.

    Thank you for your brave posts on this matter.

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