9 Rules For Managing Conflict At Work [INFOGRAPHIC]


9 Rules For Managing Conflict At Work [INFOGRAPHIC] (via A Hire Calling)

Workplace conflict is inevitable. In fact, 85 percent of employees have to deal with conflict to some degree on a regular basis. In the United States, employees spend nearly three hours per week dealing with conflict. Knowing how to handle workplace…

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Five Lies My HR Department Told Me, and The Truth Behind Them


They may not be honest-to-goodness lies, but they do represent common misunderstandings in the workplace.

Lies My HR Department Told MeHas your HR department been lying to you? Or, if you are an HR pro, have you told any of these falsehoods?

Now, before anyone goes crazy over the title, these “lies” that Human Resources departments tell are not conscious ones – nor even particularly malicious — but often based on misinformation common to many workplaces.

(Well, perhaps except the first)

Technology and changing workplace rules make the employee-employer relationship — as well as the rules that govern them — even more complex. But there is no excuse for an HR department not knowing the right way to approach these collective workplace issues.

Five Lies My HR Department Told Me, and the Truth Behind Them:

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3 Toxic Employees You Need to Fire Now


(Via Entrepreneur magazine)

toxic employeeFrom a thoughtful hiring process to a thorough training program, you’ve done everything you can to find and prepare the best employees for your company. But no system is foolproof and sometimes a few bad apples can slip through the cracks.

Of course, some people just need a simple redirect to fall in line, so trying to correct the behavior should be your first step. But other times, employees can be so toxic, they can poison your workplace, says human resources consultant Suzanne Benoit, founder of Portland, Maine-based Benoit Consulting Services.

“You can have someone who is a very good technical performer, but that makes other people in the office go home crying,” Benoit says. “If you have people who are interfering with the performance of others, you need to consider letting them go.”

It’s a good idea to consult legal counsel before you terminate someone for their behavior to ensure you’ve protected yourself. But, in her experience, Benoit says these three types of employees usually just have to go.

1. The Untouchable

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What Do Hourly Employees Value?


Nearly 60 percent of U.S. workers are hourly employees, does your organization know what makes them tick?

(Via TribeHR)

The majority of staff in the United hourly employeesStates are hourly employees who have little to no control over their work schedules. The retail industry has an annual turnover of 80–100%. The cost of replacing hourly workers is up to 1/3 of their annual salary.

That’s why when the employee engagement is low, it’s vital for businesses to get staff enthusiastic about the organization and the role they play within in.

In 2013, Gen Y (those born after 1990) made up 25 percent of the American workforce. By 2025, this number will increase to 75 percent. To keep this growing group of employees happy, they say they want to schedule flexibility, shared values, immediate feedback, and a positive work environment.

Check out the infographic below, courtesy of When I Work, for more stats on hourly employee trends:

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Heads-up for HR on same-sex marriage laws


The Supreme Court’s DOMA decision and the Legislature’s approval of the same-sex marriage law bring significant benefits implications for employers.

Via StarTribune.com:

Same-Sex marriage

The U.S. Supreme Court ruling in June that struck down a key part of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), coupled with the legalization of same-sex marriage in Minnesota, will have far-reaching effects here and in other states that recognize same-sex unions.

With the Minnesota law taking effect Aug. 1, businesses should thoroughly review their benefits policies to ensure that their programs are up to date and inclusive to all legally married couples, including same-sex marriage.

Specifically, the Supreme Court ruling provides that individuals who are defined to be legally married by a state must be granted access to federal benefits that previously were available only to married couples made up of one man and one woman.

The court found that the opposite-sex-only definition of marriage was unconstitutional because it deprived lawful same-sex marriages equal protection under the Fifth Amendment of the Constitution.

In the coming weeks, employers should evaluate their H.R. policies because Minnesota residents will soon have access to a variety of benefits, including the right to file joint income tax returns and obtain spousal benefits from Social Security. To ensure compliance with the new laws, employers should focus on these H.R. policies:

Health care coverage for same-sex marriage

All employer-sponsored self-insured coverage continues to be governed by ERISA (the Employment Retirement Income Security Act). However, the court’s ruling now requires that plans offering spousal coverage in states recognizing same-sex unions provide coverage for same-sex married partners. Businesses need to provide same-sex married couples with an opportunity to enroll or change benefits election options in health plans, including health flexible spending accounts.

To read the full article, visit StarTribune.com.

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7 Biggest Interview Mistakes HR Professionals Encounter


Via PayScale.com

Interview MistakesEver wonder what the average Human Resource professional notices in an interview when they glance across the hiring desk?

As a job seeker, this could be some very valuable insight to have – a clear advantage over other candidates who are oblivious to the mistakes they make in the interviewing hot seat.

Some people think that HR pros are calculating or hyper-analytical when engaged in an interview. While they are trained to conduct interviews in a strategic manner, human resource and recruitment professionals are actually just trying to match the right job with the right candidate.

However, there is one thing to be said about HR professionals with a few years under their belts. They’ve probably seen and heard it all when dealing with interviews. And some of the crazy things they’ve seen could cause you to think twice as a candidate.

To help you avoid making a serious snafu at the next job interview you participate in, here are some of the biggest interview mistakes in the history of human resources (to avoid at all costs).

#1 – The poor first impression in an interview

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Same-sex marriage rulings trigger big changes to HR


(Via LifeHealthPro.com)

Same-sex marriage

The Supreme Court’s decision to declare unconstitutional key provisions of the Defense of Marriage Act is expected to mean a major overhaul of federal rules affecting employee benefits administration and payroll operations.

For benefits managers, the ruling – striking down a key section of the hotly contested 1996 law that prohibits federal recognition of same-sex marriages– also means more confusion while they wait for more legal rulings and IRS rules to come.

Under the ruling, same-sex marriage legally wed where allowed by various states now must be treated as spouses under the U.S. tax code, ERISA, and more than 1,000 other federal laws.

The ruling in the DOMA cases well as in California’s Proposition 8 battle take effect immediately and, according to Mercer, possibly even retroactively.

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