New Study: HR Professionals, Recruitment and Relocation


HR Professionals: Recruiting and Relocation Environment is Changing

From AlliedHR IQ:

According to the 2013 Allied Workforce Mobility Survey, HR professionals believe the hiring environment is improving compared to 2012 results.

HR Professional Unemployment Report

In addition, in light of the decision by Yahoo CEO Melissa Mayer to end its telecommuting policy, the 2013 Allied Workforce Mobility Survey revealed that telecommuting, while not universally implemented, is utilized in various ways:

Overall, telecommuting policies are weak regardless of company size, however, most feel their organizations provide “flexible working arrangements” that are stronger than their telecommuting policies alone.

Telecommuting is allowed in less than half the organizations surveyed, but many still allow employees to work remotely even though they don’t have a formal telecommuting policy.

HR Professional Report Mobility

Large companies have stronger telecommuting policies, but it doesn’t play a significant role for those that have highly successful recruiting programs.

The amount of employees who misuse the telecommuting policy is minimal, but the main reason cited for misuse is a perceived lack of rapid communication. Companies who offered telecommuting in 2012 plan to continue the policy moving forward.

HR Professionals Executive RelocateThe 2013 Allied Workforce Mobility Survey, sponsored by Allied Van Lines, asked HR professionals about strategies, practices and performances relating to workforce mobility. The results address recruiting and relocation.

Two hundred HR professionals in the U.S. took part in the survey, sharing their perspectives on how they manage recruitment and relocation in the current economic context. They noted what they were and were not doing well.

In addition, they reported on  a wide range of strategies, approaches and practices, which varied not only by the size of their companies, but also by the success of their recruiting and relocation programs (see Segments for more).

These differences may illuminate a path toward improving recruitment and relocation practices for all firms, even those that currently lag well behind industry leaders.

figure 11

HR Professionals See Mobility Picture Is Improving

In the 2013 Allied Mobile Workforce Mobility Survey, 20% of HR professionals characterized unemployment in their region as “high or “excessive,” but it was lower than the 30% reported in the 2012 survey.

Overall, HR professionals were pretty bullish on how they perceive today’s workforce mobility attitude:

  • Moderately Mobile………………………………………..47%
  • Somewhat Mobile…………………………………………44%
  • Highly Mobile……………………………………………….7%
  • Not Mobile…………………………………………………..3%

This mentality was seen for most available positions, not just specific opportunities, which shows promise for the hiring outlook.

HR Professionals Relocation motivations

Relocation Continues to Favor the Young

Younger candidates are the most willing to relocate given the right incentives, according to the survey; 61% see candidates 30 years old or younger the most willing to relocate.

What drives people to move for a new opportunity?

Seventy-seven percent (77%) surveyed indicated career advancement and a bigger salary. Other factors included better benefits and a new environment.

HR Professionals : Desires to RelocateOf those who didn’t want to relocate, 77% felt that a candidate’s home and family obligations were the biggest factors.

In addition, selling their home, issues related to their family network (i.e. aging parents, friends/family), and allegiance to a current employer were also factors.

Original post at www.allied.com.

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